Brewery & Soft Drink

  • Teamster Strike Shuts Down Budweiser Distribution On Long Island

    April 24, 2017

    Heartless Owners Say They Will Permanently Replace Over 100 Long-time Workers on Strike

    GREAT NECK, NY – The workers who deliver, sell, and merchandise Budweiser, Heineken, and other beer products to Nassau and Suffolk Counties walked the picket line today, largely stopping distribution on Long Island. The over 100 drivers and warehousemen, who work for Clare Rose and are members of Teamsters Local 812, began striking when the company announced 30 percent wage cuts and ended the drivers’ pension.

    “This is a highly profitable company in a stable industry. There is no explanation for massive wage and retirement cuts other than greed,” said Teamsters Local 812 President Ed Weber. “These are the middle-class jobs that we used to be able to count on in Long Island. We aren’t going to give up our livelihoods just so the rich can get richer.”

  • Rick Hicks

    You can’t fight obesity by killing jobs – No Beverage Tax in Seattle

    Rick HicksAn Op-ed by Local 174 Secretary-Treasurer Rick Hicks

    The tax on sugar-sweetened beverages proposed by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray is a disaster in waiting for local workers, businesses and families. On its surface, the tax may sound like a good idea: fighting the obesity epidemic while funding education at the same time – who wouldn’t like that? But the reality is that it is working families who will end up shouldering the heavy burden of this proposed tax.

    Similar taxes have already been implemented in other major cities in the United States, and the effects have been devastating to workers. Teamster families at Local 830 in Philadelphia have already begun to feel the negative impacts that this tax creates, as Philadelphia started collecting a 1.5 cents-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages on January 1, 2017.

    Since then, Local 830’s Principal Officer Danny Grace reports that: Beverage companies as a whole have seen their sales decrease between 40%-54%; Pepsi Philadelphia has announced a first round of layoffs of between 80-100 employees, and Teamster commissioned salespersons for Pepsi have seen their weekly take home pay decrease between 50% to 70% due to lost sales in the market; Coca-Cola has initiated layoffs of approximately 30% of its work force in Philadelphia; Canada Dry/7-UP and Dr. Pepper has initiated layoffs of 35 Employees.

    All of these job losses have come from a tax of 1.5 cents-per-ounce – but Seattle Mayor Murray has proposed a tax of 2 cents-per-ounce. That is 33.3% higher.

  • Ft. Myer’s Southern Glazer’s Wine And Spirits Drivers Vote Teamsters

    April 12, 2017

    Beer and Liquor Drivers Join Local 79

    Delivery drivers working for Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits in Ft. Myer, Florida, have voted to join Teamsters Local 79, Tampa. The majority of the 30-driver unit voted in favor of joining the union.

    “Being a Teamster is going to make a big difference on the job for us at Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits,” said Enrique Vasquez, a driver.

  • Teamsters Local 174’s Fight Against the Beverage Tax Continues

    Our fight against the proposed Sugar Tax continued yesterday, as the Teamsters participated in a press conference to announce a coalition of small business, labor, and immigrant groups who all oppose this two-cent-per-ounce proposed tax on pre-sweetened beverages within the City of Seattle.

    Teamsters Local 174 Business Agent Pete Lamb gave a speech highlighting the job-killing effects of this kind of tax, which have already been seen by Teamsters in Philadelphia.

    View the Seattle Times article covering yesterday’s event below.

    You can read more about Teamsters Local 174’s position on this issue by clicking here.

    View our photos from yesterday’s event:

  • The Sugar Tax: How has it affected Philadelphia, and how could it affect Seattle?

    March 29, 2017

    On February 21, 2017, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray proposed a tax on sugary beverages for the City of Seattle. This tax, which would affect sodas, sports drinks, energy drinks, pre-sweetened teas, coffees, and some fruit drinks, has already been implemented in several other major cities in the United States.

    One of the most recent cities to adopt this type of tax is Philadelphia, where a 1.5 cent-per-ounce tax on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages went into effect on January 1, 2017.

    The effects of this tax have been disastrous for the Beverage industry in Philadelphia. According to the Principal Officer of Teamsters Local 830, Danny Grace, the effects have been:

    • Beverage companies as a whole have seen their sales decrease between 40%-54%
    • Pepsi Philadelphia has announced a first round of layoffs of between 80-100 employees. Teamster commissioned salespersons for Pepsi have seen their weekly take home pay decrease between 50% to 70% due to lost sales in the market
    • Coca-Cola has initiated layoffs of approximately 30% of its work force in Philadelphia
    • Canada Dry/7-UP and Dr. Pepper has initiated layoffs of 35 Employees

    The tax proposed by Seattle Mayor Ed Murray would be $.02 per ounce, which is approximately 33.5% higher than the tax that went into effect in Philadelphia.

    “The impacts of such a tax in Seattle will be devastating to the hundreds of Teamster members that are employed in the Beverage industry,” said Teamsters Local 174 Secretary-Treasurer Rick Hicks. “And the impact wouldn’t stop there. This tax will have negative impacts on both Union and non-represented employees throughout the Beverage, Grocery, and Food Service industries as well. We cannot and do not support a tax that will put hardworking middle-class Americans out of a job, no matter how well-intentioned the tax may be.”

  • Teamsters Urge Court Intervention to Protect Public Interest in Mega Beer Merger

    October 7, 2016

    Failure by DOJ to Require Divestiture Puts Consumers at Risk

    (WASHINGTON) – In a comment letter submitted to the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) this week, the International Brotherhood of Teamsters raises serious questions whether the Antitrust Division has adequately remedied the harm to competition resulting from the largest beer merger in history – the $107 billion merger of Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABI) [NYSE: BUD] with SABMiller.